coronavirus Tag

Show Notes The Argument by Slogan Fallacy is committed when someone uses a short snappy phrase to avoid making an argument that actually requires some nuance, explanation or evidence.   Trump We started out with this clip of Trump's rally crowd chanting "Lock her up!" in 2016: We followed that up with this clip of...

Show Notes The Argument by Gibberish Fallacy is committed when someone uses jargon or nonsense in place of an argument or an answer because they are unable to provide a coherent, useful or logical response.   Trump We started out with this clip of Trump on the Dr. Oz show answering the question "What...

Show Notes The No True Scotsman Fallacy is committed when your existing definition of a particular group is challenged by a member who doesn't fit the criteria. Rather than adjust the definition, the offending group member is redefined as a non-member of the group. The name comes from an example given in...

Show Notes The Rhetorical Question Fallacy is a way of accusing people of something while appearing to be 'just asking questions'. Often the questions being asked have already been debunked or already have a satisfactory answer.   Trump We started out with this clip of Trump accusing healthcare workers of stealing PPE during a...

Show Notes The Hedging Fallacy is committed when someone changes their story or point of view and then acts like nothing has changed and they always thought like that.   Trump We started out with this clip of Trump answering a journalist who asked him why his tone shifted and he started taking the...

Show Notes The Wrong Tool Fallacy is committed when someone tries to present evidence for their argument, but the method or tool they are using isn't designed to show what they claim it shows. We started out with this clip of Trump bragging about the Dow Jones: Then we looked at this clip...

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